What You Need to Know About the Tokyo Olympics
Laura Lee - April 19, 2021

Looking Back

by Edgar A. Guest

I might have been rich if I'd wanted the gold
instead of the friendships I've made.
I might have had fame if I'd sought for renown
in the hours when I purposely played.
Now I'm standing to-day on the far edge of life,
and I'm just looking backward to see
What I've done with the years and the days that were mine,
and all that has happened to me.

I haven't built much of a fortune to leave
to those who shall carry my name,
And nothing I've done shall entitle me now
to a place on the tablets of fame.
But I've loved the great sky and its spaces of blue;
I've lived with the birds and the trees;
I've turned from the splendor of silver and gold
to share in such pleasures as these.

I've given my time to the children who came;
together we've romped and we've played,
And I wouldn't exchange the glad hours spent
with them for the money that I might have made.
I chose to be known and be loved by the few,
and was deaf to the plaudits of men;
And I'd make the same choice should the chance
come to me to live my life over again.

I've lived with my friends and I've shared in their joys,
known sorrow with all of its tears;
I have harvested much from my acres of life,
though some say I've squandered my years.
For much that is fine has been mine to enjoy,
and I think I have lived to my best,
And I have no regret, as I'm nearing the end,
for the gold that I might have possessed.

Athletes and Olympic games fans alike are excited for the upcoming Olympic Games. Already postponed a full year, the Tokyo Games are scheduled to get underway July 23, 2021, and officials have said repeatedly that an Olympics can be safely staged this summer, even as public sentiment in Japan wavers and health experts highlight some of the dangers. Olympic officials and Tokyo organizers are sure that the Summer Games will take place as scheduled.

 

But what happens if the Olympics can’t actually be held in 2021? Thomas Bach, the president of the International Olympic Committee, has said there is no “Plan B.” If the Tokyo Games can’t be staged this summer, they probably won’t be held at all. The Japanese have tied up billions of dollars into hosting these Games, but neither the Tokyo organizers nor the IOC seem interested in kicking the can down the road. Complicating any additional postponement scenarios, the IOC already is starting to turn much of its attention to the 2022 Winter Games in Beijing, which are scheduled to begin just six months after the Tokyo Olympics. Since 1896, the Summer Olympics have taken place every four years except for 1916, 1940 and 1944, when they were canceled because of world wars.

 

Getty Images/News/Chris McGrath

 

How will they keep athletes safe during the Games? Athletes, along with all other attendees and participants, will be required to follow strict guidelines, aimed at minimizing risk and limiting exposure to the virus. Athletes will not be allowed to stay in the Olympic Village for the duration of the Tokyo Games and must depart after their competitions conclude. Each athlete will be given a “playbook” that outlines a series of protocols and restrictions. They’ll be barred from using public transportation or visiting non-Olympic sites, including local bars, restaurants, shops and tourist destinations. Athletes will be urged to maintain good hygiene and practice social distancing. They’ll be tested for the coronavirus at least once every four days and will have to log daily health updates into a smartphone app.

 

Tokyo 2020 officials decided that only Japanese spectators would be allowed to attend these Olympics. The decision was made to limit the number of foreigners coming into the country as organizers sought to keep both the local population and the Olympic proceedings as safe as possible.